More recently, Stitt announced in August his selection of the fourth director of the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority. In doing so, he said, “I am committed to tackling the major challenges that the explosion of marijuana in Oklahoma is causing across our state.”

According to Green, one of the driving factors for the proposal was to ensure oversight independent from the state Health Department “to increase transparency and create a structure that could be functional.”

“When decisions are being made about how funds are being spent, … you have to go to either the commissioner of health or the governor to understand the decisions that are being made,” he said. “You can try to have conversations and be productive with OMMA directors, but at the end of the day, they’re having talks that you’re not in the room for.

“And they’re making decisions that are not in line with the industry, and it’s tough. We have all the reason to believe the governor is not going to sign off on a new state agency if it makes it through the Senate.”

Nearly 178,000 valid signatures would be required on each of the petitions for it to be placed on a ballot in 2022.

The medical petition called the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Enforcement and Anti-Corruption Act would amend the Oklahoma Constitution to create, within a year, the Oklahoma State Cannabis Commission for medical cannabis businesses and patients. The State Health Department would, at the discretion of the OSCC’s board, retain oversight power on food permits and safety issues with cannabis products.

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